The wider benefits of positive thinking

The brain is not only one of the most complex organs in our bodies, it is probably one of the most complex creations in the whole universe. It is unlikely that we know 10% of the complexities and capabilities of this organ that we all have and that is in our continuous use, even when we sleep.

Yet one of the things we do know is how binary one of its more basic functions is. Our brains do perceive things as either positive (not a threat) or negative (a danger). If our lives are under threat we know that the primitive mind takes over to save us (usually called flight or fight reactions). In primitive man, these responses would have overridden our intellect if we were being attacked by a lion. In modern times, these can be triggered by a bad day at work.

So what happens when we worry, get anxious or stress out? Those same systems kick in and we have a limited number of built in reactions – aggression, anxiety or depression.

We also know that our brain is neuroplastic and that, over time, it changes shape. Over time, the areas that deal with the responses of anger and anxiety increase in size and become our default mode.

What we focus on, therefore, will literally become our reality.

If all our problems are on the left and all our happy experiences on the right then, just by focusing on the right, we change the wiring of our brain to use this as our default mode, whatever the situation.

This is something that people who have had hypnotherapy know very well. They have had such acute focus on solutions that they no longer tend to see problems whatsoever.

The science is so simple and, when hypnotherapy is no longer seen as a magic trick, we will be able to use it to change our minds magnificently.

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